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Miracles of Life “Pocket Rocket” Race Horse

Miracles of Life racehorse

Miracles of Life and Daniel Clarken

Miracles of Life and Daniel Clarken

It is estimated that 100,000 horses a year in America are sent to the slaughter house for horse meat, and ten percent are racehorses, as the video via the link below, showing a beautiful 4 year old race horse resccued from the “kill pen”,  reports.  Approximately 18000 racehorses are killed a year in Australia, for dog meat.  Please support the re-homing of Australian race horses via the   Australian Horse Welfare Society please.   Racehorses are NOT property.   They are living beings with souls.  Some like to race and some don’t.

http://video.kcts9.org/video/1809648702/

While I don’t condone horse racing because it is an industry run for the profit and entertainment of human beings, at the cost of many horses being hurt in accidents, or discarded because they do not win; I do observe some of it and came across a beautiful pint sized 2 year old chestnut filly called “Miracles of Life” nick-named the Pocket Rocket.  She is from Australia and trained by Daniel Clarken of South Australia.  Her father (technically called her “sire”) was “Not a Single Doubt” and her mother (technically called her “dam”) was “Dazzling Gazelle”.

Miracles of Life is owned by Sri Lankan billionaire Mr Muzaffar Yaseen, who runs a major garment export business.  Teeley Assets’s  Iris O’Farrell is the “Bloodstock Manager” for Mr Yaseen, and recounts the chance that led to her becoming the racehorse buyer for Mr Yaseen.

Miracles of Life in stable

Miracles of Life, Lauren and Stable cat, Delilah

Mr Yaseen reserves for himself the task of naming his horses, often recognisable by names connected with the apparel trade, and phrases with slightly exotic or spiritual qualities.  “Miracles of Life” rather aptly describes the serendipitous turn of events that put the filly in Daniel Clarken’s stable; and an apprentice female jockey, Lauren Stojakovic, undaunted by a series of injuries, on her back.

Lauren Stojakovic is a 29-year-old apprentice who has been with Clarken for five years.  She started as an apprentice at 17 and thought she would be the best female jockey in the world,  but a series of falls, including a broken pelvis, all but ended her career.

So she became a qualified vet nurse, drove trotters and worked part-time as a race steward.  Five years ago she began riding in Adelaide for Daniel Clarken.  She has been riding the cast-off filly that she calls Barbie, because of her long blonde mane, in her last 3 wins; and was nearly replaced for today’s race.

In recent months Stojakovic has become one of Adelaide’s most consistent jockeys and sits just outside the metro top fifteen.

Miracles Of Life easily won two races in Adelaide before her breathtaking win in the fillies’ Blue Diamond Preview at Caulfield last Saturday week.

This page below shows her some of her  “form” for racing, which means how she went in her recent races.  “I really thought this filly was off to the paddock after her first win but she has demanded we keep going with her,” Clarken said.

http://www.puntersparadise.com.au/horses/Miracles-of-Life_214705/

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I have just watched the Pocket Rocket on television as she ran in the Blue Diamond Stakes race.  The little filly won the race decisively.

Lauren has said about her relationship with Miracles of Life –

After one of her first serious gallops I said to Dan she was a weapon. She was just outstanding. She’s a pretty straight forward ride and when you ask, she really gives you everything.  We have a bond and I’ve got a huge amount of faith in her so I’m just really thankful for the opportunity.

The Blue Diamond Stakes race is run annually in Australia, and is Victoria’s premier sprint race for Group 1 thoroughbred two year old horses, offering an unmatched $1 million in prize money within Australia.

The Group 1 Blue Diamond Stakes is held at Melbourne’s Caulfield Racecourse each Melbourne Autumn Racing Carnival and is run over a distance of 1200m.

As a set-weight race, colts and geldings in the Blue Diamond Stakes are required to carry 55.5kg and fillies must carry 53kg. The winner of the Blue Diamond Stakes takes home $600,000 in prize money plus a trophy worth $15,000.

Read more:

http://www.races.com.au/races/group-1/blue-diamond-stakes/#ixzz2Lh7gia9k

As one member of the public commented on “Racenet” –

Once every few years I am reminded that horse racing is not all about the punt. Today was one of those days, we saw loyalty and faith rewarded, a no name trainer, a battling talented jockey and a gutsy little horse from a state who’s racing stocks are often ridiculed, showing that big operations and big name jockeys do not have an exclusive hold on the big money races. All the more enjoyable was the passion and emotion shown by all.

Whether she wins or not, I love this smart, pretty little horse (and Delilah too, of course); and wish all racehorses (and cats) to be well taken care of.

811290-family-affair

South Australian wonder horse Miracles Of Life with jockey Lauren Stojakovic and stable cat Delilah.

 Picture: Mark Brake Source: The Advertiser

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2 thoughts on “Miracles of Life “Pocket Rocket” Race Horse

  1. i am generally opposed to those who oppose race industry, despite that a nice write up on “Miracles of life”, informative, fare & nicely framed report.

    just remember, thoroughbreds are bred to race & horses have raced for 1000;s of years hence its popularity, the horses enjoy the competitive nature of the sport yet i do agree sadly with your feelings on the wastefulness of these fine animals, but where do we put them?

  2. I, too, believe that most thoroughbreds love to run. It’s the care and concern they do or do not get throughout their lives that troubles me. Greed and cruelty have no place in any sport, but especially those sports that involve animals.

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