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Archive for the category “Extinction”

Harambe – a rallying cry for tolerance

harambe

Harambe” is said to be an African chant, a rallying cry for unity and co-operation, used in Kenya.

Harambe is also the name for a rare & endangered 17 Year Old Western lowland silver-back Gorilla that was moved to Cincinnati Zoo back in 2014 from the Gladys Porter Zoo in Brownsville.

He was sadly killed on May 28th, 2016 at Cincinnati Zoo in Ohio.

He was killed due to a young unattended child falling into his holding area due to a negligent inattentive parent.

The zoo director, Thane Maynard, confirmed the gorilla did not appear to be attacking the child, but he described it as ‘an extremely strong animal in an agitated situation’.

‘You’re talking about an animal that’s over 400 pounds and extremely strong. So no, the child wasn’t under attack but all sorts of things could happen in a situation like that. He certainly was at risk.’

Given time and the right ( calm ) environment, some animal behaviour experts say, that Harambe would have handed over the child.  I think that Homo sapiens or human beings excel at not trusting or having faith in what they can do, and instead they stereotype the situation “big animal, we can’t control him, the boy may be hurt by the big strong animal, let’s kill the Gorilla, rather than try to subdue the situation and try a little longer to rescue the boy, while keeping the gorilla alive”.

During a press conference on Monday, Maynard said Harambe was ‘behaving erratically’, before adding: ‘The child wasn’t just being endangered, but dragged around by the ankle and hurt.’  The gorilla is or was intelligent and dragged the boy away from screaming on-lookers to protect the boy.  Anyone can see in the stills that the Gorilla did not intend to purposely harm the child.  The child, of course, was hurt when he fell in.

News reports say the zoo will review whether the enclosure is secure enough, and the Zoo Director has said “what do you expect from a 4 year old child”, when the real issues are the enclosure was not doubled up to prevent this from happening  AND  the parents took their eyes off the boy.  The parents thank God for keeping their child safe and for having the right people there at the right time – which is pretty ironic –  as they were there too and supposed to be actually keeping a close hold of their four year old.

Harambe1
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Soon all the fuss will die down, Harambe whom grew up in captivity, will be missed by his primate family.   Another rare and endangered animal willfully destroyed, because of careless parents and short-shortsightedness with not having the enclosure child proof.
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The parents had 4 children and could have been looking after the youngest properly, especially because he had said he wanted to play in the water, and the Zoo or someone in the Public could have asked sometime before 28 May 2016, for the enclosure to be made more secure.   A quick acting zoo visitor could have scaled the fence and grabbed the boy.

On the day of Harmabe’s death, someone clear headed about having a calm environment with the situation at the zoo ( yes it is possible ) could have cleared the area away from shouting panicking on-lookers.

Yes, so many COULDS or SHOULDS, with the moral of this story being for the Cincinatti Zoo to do the right thing regarding its responsibilities toward its captive animals welfare and toward the zoo visitors.  Issues around whether we should have Zoos at all will arise, for example, why not just have them as Conservation Centres not even open to the public?
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I for one don’t want to go to a “Zoo” to stare at animals.
The End  ( of Harmabe’s short life – Gorillas can live to 60 years of age )

Help save Sudan, northern White Rhino

The ultimate solution is to stop the demand for Rhino & Elephant tusks/products

 

AnimalSymbolismRhinocerosMeaning

With only 5 individuals remaining, the survival prospects for the northern white rhino seem bleak.

Ol Pejeta Reserve in East Africa is home to three of the world’s last five northern white rhinos, including Sudan the last male, and also to 106 critically endangered black rhinos, and 20 southern white rhinos. It is the largest black rhino sanctuary in East Africa, and a centre for innovation in conservation and wildlife protection.

43 year old Sudan and some female rhinos were transported from a Zoo to the Reserve, in the hope that they would breed to help continue the line of the Northern White Rhino.  Sudan needs around the clock protection from human beings, and has had his horn removed in a bid to deter poachers from taking him.

Please click on the link below, to get information and see photos of Sudan.

Save SUDAN the Rhino

The Reserve he lives on is susceptible to poachers, and you can contribute toward Sudan’s protection through a donation via “crowdfunding”.

Please if you have a conscience and want to contribute toward stopping all of our non-human Animal species from being wiped out, share this Post and have people including yourself, click on the LINK BELOW, in order to contribute $1 or $2 or any amount –  to help keep Sudan safe.  Thank you from Sudan.

http://www.gofundme.com/olpejeta

Ol Pejeta is a  90,000 acre wildlife preserve 330km north of Nairobi, Kenya.  While it is a tourism attraction, gaining revenue from vehicle drives through the roads in the Reserve, it is well managed.  However, because of its size, it is a continual challenge to protect all of the animals within it.

For animal symbolism of the RHINO,   click  HERE.

 

 LINKS OF INTEREST

Demilitarised Drones to be used to Protect animals in Ol Pejeta Reserve

Visitor Reviews of Ol Pejeta Reserve

What to do during your Stay at Ol Pejeta Reserve

Agricultural Development Corporation joins with Ol Pejeta to conserve Animals

 

Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Perissodactyla
Family: Rhinocerotidae
Genus: Ceratotherium
Species: C. simum

Can a Horse feel Guilt ?

Well, I believe that all animals have Souls and that non-human animals also have intelligence, and in fact, some have more intelligence than some human beings.  I also believe that some non-human animals can also feel emotions and feelings – emotions being feelings that are expressed physically.

If you are at all interested or drawn to communicating with animals, please pursue that interest, as the World would benefit, I think, from Homo sapiens or human beings genuinely connecting with their animal companions and the animal world at large.

There are plenty of resources for this, excellent books, and Animal Communicators, that run courses in communicating with animals, and / or who will connect with your special Animal friend as a service they run, and give you messages from them, or relay questions from your animal companions.

A load of “bunkum”, some of you say?  “That’s strange” or “I don’t understand that” others may decry.  Well, consider this – communication is universal.  The spoken language had to start somewhere.  It is made up.  Communication also exists as mental images and concepts which are on the “air-waves” or which are conveyed by the intention of the sender, as frequencies of energy which an open and devoted receiver can pick up.

I have personally experienced it myself.  It’s called telepathy.  Once a baby human being telepathically spoke to me, and if Homo sapiens can pick up telepathic messages from other human beings, why can’t they pick up telepathic messages from non human beings?   Please visit the page below to explore further.

Talk to the Animals

Now, to answer the Question that is the Title of this Post,
the answer is YES.

Click on the Link below to read the true story of a racehorse that felt guilt over a little girl.

http://spirit-animals.com/animals/the-unhappy-racehorse/

Animals are not lesser beings.  They may serve a purpose to some human beings, but should be treated with respect, as David Attenborough says.  We use tools, don’t we, like knives & forks, and computers, but don’t say they are lesser things than us.

In my “books” or viewpoint,  ALL LIFE  is sacred in terms of, yes, some of us may eat animals, and I have heard that some animals are aware of this purpose or relationship and accept it, but let’s not go over-board and take more than we need, or out-rightly abuse various animal species as just commodities, for our own pleasure or profit.   Farming animals uses an enormous amount of land that could be used to grow & harvest plants for human consumption.

Remember the following, that we all came / come from the “primoridal soup” or from the hot ocean vents, and the predecessors/ancestors of Homo sapiens and other Animals are the same – bacteria !!  This is according to scientists, like Professor Brian Cox, and the point is that just because we human beings CAN “conquer” or farm and trap non-human animals, CAN is not a good reason for actually doing so – to the extent that we are being cruel to animals and degrading our Earth.

We CAN eat with our fingers but in the so-called civilized countries, we DON’T.  It’s our CHOICE what we do with this beautiful and fascinating World that we live in.

Mitakuye Oyasin  –

we are  ALL  related

What’s Orange & beautiful and Needs your Help

Orang-utan Beanie Toy

It’s the Orang-utan.

Orangutan Facts

Orangutans are great apes, as opposed to monkeys, and are closely related to humans, having 97% of DNA in common.

Orangutans are extremely patient and intelligent mammals. They are very observant and inquisitive, and there are many stories of orangutans escaping from zoos after having watched their keepers unlock and lock doors.

Extinction in the wild is likely in the next 10 years for Sumatran Orangutans and soon after for Bornean Orangutans. The Sumatran species (Pongo abelii) is Critically Endangered and the Bornean species (Pongo pygmaeus) of orangutans is Endangered according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species.

The Sumatran and Bornean Orangutans’ rainforest habitats are disappearing at an alarming rate due to deforestation and clearing of the land for pulp paper and palm oil plantations, with the remaining forest degraded by drought and forest fires.

You can help the Orang-utans by not buying products with Palm Oil in them and / or by making a donation to The Orang-utan Project.  Any amount, however small or LARGE will help.  Please visit the excellent website of the Western Australian The Orangutan Project  for GREAT information, wonderful photos of these gorgeous creatures, and abundant information about the Orang-utans and the SUPERB work of the T. O. P. organisation.

gokong

Follow the T.O.P. Project & you will receive Newsletters like this one here.

Share the information with your Family & Friends and with Strangers, with your Teachers & your Students.

Also, see the other Posts & Pages of my blog.

Action Alerts –  Orang utans

Help save Orang-utans

Help Sumatran elephants and Orang-utans

Palm Oil in Australia

Please help me – help Chocolate the orang utan

Celebrate Easter by helping Chocolate the orang utan

DON’T JUST STICK YOUR HEAD IN THE SAND

DO SOMETHING TO HELP THE ANIMALS

saveanorangutan

Stop the landfill of the Dugong habitat in Okinawa

Urgent stamp

Please sign and share this   PETITION   calling on Okinawa Governor Nakaima to deny the landfill application for the waters of Henoko.

Okinawa dugong, a close relative of the manatee and the northernmost population of its species, is now on the verge of extinction. The dugong, a gentle marine mammal once commonly seen around Okinawa, has long been a symbol of the sea rich in life. The coast off Henoko, in Nago, still beautiful with wildlife such as corals and turtles, holds a rich sea-grass colony where the dugong feed.

However, there are plans to landfill this area to construct a US military base.

In March, Minister of Defense Itsunori Onodera filed with Okinawa Governor Hirokazu Nakaima an application for approval to landfill waters off Henoko in order to build a new base. This filing used an environmental assessment conducted by the Defense Bureau to claim that the dugongs will “stay far away from the construction site”.

The Governor has already expressed grave concerns regarding the environmental assessment and impact on the welfare of local residents. In response, the Defense Bureau has simply maintained its assertion that the dugongs would not be affected.

But on September 22, Kyodo News broke the story that the Defense Bureau had actively hidden important facts about dugong activity in Henoko waters uncovered during its environmental assessment.

Dugong feeding traces had been found in the waters off Henoko through April to June last year and a dugong was sighted in Oura Bay, adjacent to the Henoko beach. It’s clear that for the Defense Bureau, those findings constituted ‘inconvenient truths’ better hidden from the public.

The Governor will make his decision on the project before December. If this project is carried out, the Henoko seagrass beds, together with the Okinawa dugong, will be lost forever.

We hope all the people of the world will join us in an effort to continue to co-exist with the dugongs. Please sign and share our   petition   calling on Okinawa Governor Nakaima to deny the landfill application for the waters of Henoko.

TAKE ACTION NOW

Thank you for your support.

From the Association to Protect the Northernmost Dugong —
Masako Suzuki, Etsuko Urashima, Iyanaga Kenichi

Henoko, Okinawa, Japan

Please Help Me

Orang-utan Beanie Toy

Wild populations of the orangutan, found only in Aceh Province in southern Sumatra, Indonesia, have declined by 80 percent in the past 75 years. Only about 6,600 orangutans were left in Sumatra, according to the   “Rarest of the Rare”  2010 report.   It really breaks my heart to think that these amazing and wonderful animals could become extinct.

Click on the “Read More” link below to see more photos of the Beanie toy.   The time is to ACT NOW, not to stick your head in the sand and ignore matters like this, or to leave them to others to help.   Show your appreciation for Life on Earth by signing the Petitions – it only takes a minute of your time.  Thank you!

Read more…

Celebrate Easter by helping Chocolate, the Orang-utan

chocolate the orang-utan

Chocolate the orang-utan

Courtesy of The Orang-utan Project

http://www.orangutan.org.au/adopt_orphan_orangutan/chocolate

Introducing “Chocolate” a gorgeous two year old Sumatran orang-utan.  The habitat of orang-utans and elephants in Sumatra and Asia has been degraded by human activity, at the expense of these animals.

When you buy your easter chocolate, have a look at the ingredients and if one of them is Palm Oil or Vegetable Oil, think about putting it back on the shelf and opting for a non palm oil chocolate.  Palm oil plantations can be replaced by eco-tourism and other businesses, so that the habitat of the Sumatran wildlife will not be wiped out within the next ten to thirty years.

You can download a palm-free Easter chocolate guide from the page below.

http://www.orangutan.org.au/palm-oil

A regular or once-off financial donation will help Chocolate, the orang-utan.   Please click on the link below to help.

http://www.orangutan.org.au/adopt_orphan_orangutan/chocolate

Also, go to the Home page of the The Orang-utan Project (TOP) website to read and learn, and find other ways to help, like volunteering.

You can help Sumatran elephants by reading about the rescue of Bona at this post   HERE.

The Sumatran Orang-Utan is critically endangered.

See the IUCN Red List link about this below.

http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/39780/0

Help stop habitat destruction in Aceh and Riau.

Thank you on behalf of the Sumatran wildlife.

PLEASE SEE   THIS   POST ALSO ABOUT ORANGUTANS

Senate Bill 310 regulates the sale and ownership of exotic animals in Ohio

Siberian Tiger Painting by talented artist Jason Morgan

Tiger Paintings – Wildlife Art – Origninals and Prints

Columbus, Ohio  Sep 22, 2012

Signed by Gov. John Kasich, the law, which takes effect in 90 days, bans the acquisition, sale and breeding of restricted species in Ohio as of Jan. 1, 2014.

The mandatory registration of banned species by current owners of banned animals will begin when the bill takes effect.

People who currently own restricted list (banned) animals can keep their animals as long as the animals live, if they register them with the state and follow regulations on caging, signage and care.

On the restricted (banned) list are large cats, bears, elephants, certain monkeys, rhinos, alligators, crocodiles, anacondas and pythons longer than 12 feet, certain vipers and venomous snakes.

There are several classifications of permits, including “wildlife shelter,” which will cost $250 to $1,000, depending on the number of animals. Owners must also buy liability insurance or a surety bond of $200,000 to $1 million.

Ohio has been one of seven states that have no restrictions on private ownership of exotic animals.  The law will ban new ownership of specific wild animals, including big cats, bears, hyenas, gray wolves, some primates, alligators and crocodiles. People who already own these animals can keep them as long as they obtain permits and follow other rules.
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Read more…

Polar Bears – on Thin Ice

polar bear cubs

Photo Link:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/20406121@N04/2222146906/

Polar bears are strong swimmers, but swimming long distances in open water is draining and can be fatal. In 2008 a radio-collared bear with a yearling cub swam an astounding 427 miles to reach the ice off the northern Alaska coast. The cub didn’t make it.

A grim future for polar bears is one of the most tangible and poignant outcomes of global warming.  In 2006, federal researchers reported that two-thirds of the world’s polar bear habitat could vanish by mid-century.   Saving the Polar Bears all hinges on reducing greenhouse gas emissions – carbon dioxide and other pollution from the burning of fossil fuels.   Time is running out.

Humankind needs to make a choice.

Read more…

Mayan Bead Art by Jose Reanda – Animals

Bead Art Turtle 3

Bead Art Turtle 1

Imagine a table piece made from hundreds or thousands of tiny coloured beads !

Jose Reanda began learning to weave, under his mother’s tutelage, when he was 13 years old. In his late teens he began weaving with beads and later became a founding “beader” in Santiago Atitlan, Guatemala. He taught the art to others and is considered one of the driving forces behind this growing cottage industry. Skilled beaders are able to earn about 3 times more than they would by doing day labor work in neighboring and the effects on family health, education and so much more has been huge.

Jose’s work is unique and represents some of the finest bead work anywhere in the world. Each piece can take from one day to one week to create and no two are identical.  Mayan Majix is supporting the work of the bead artists.  Each purchase goes a long way to support Jose and his family.  Jose’s subjects include mythical and endangered animals.

Beading has revolutionized the lives of many people in this area, and is now an important artisan industry in Santiago Atitlan.   I have just broken into my savings, because I fell in love with this little turtle – and I want to support the Mayan family.   So, this cute little guy is swimming its way gallantly across the oceans just to get to me !!

Please look at the 2 links below, and consider supporting Jose’s family in Guatemala, or asking others to do so.  Thank you.

Mayan Majix – bead Table Art – Turtle

Mayn Bead Art – Dragons & other

Thylacine – Tasmanian Tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus)

Thylacine   (Thylacinus cynocephalus)

Distribution:   Prehistorically, Australia and New Guinea; Historically, Tasmania.

Last Record:   Night of 7 September 1936.

thylacine

Source of picture and information:    The Rain Forest Info org   http://rainforestinfo.org.au

The thylacine was the largest marsupial predator to have survived into historic times. Before the introduction of the dingo to mainland Australia around four thousand years ago it was widespread on the mainland and in New Guinea. When first encountered by Europeans in the early nineteenth century it was restricted to the island of Tasmania. There, however, it occurred in a variety of habitats, but not apparently the dense rainforests of the southwest.

Thylacines were rather wolf-like in shape, males reaching around thirty-five and females twenty-five kilograms in weight. They seem to have hunted singly, in pairs and in family groups (male, female and one to three young), pursuing wallabies and other prey by scent, eventually running them to exhaustion or into ambush.

Lairs were often located among rocks, and young stayed with the female until they were well grown and able to hunt independently. The Tasmanian Aborigines occasionally hunted them, but would build a curious shelter over the bones, believing that if they were rained upon then very bad weather would follow.

Read more…

The Age of the Mammals from 65 million years ago (mya)

Mammoths

65 milion years ago (mya) the Cenozoic Era began in the time-scale of geological units.  Each Era is divided into Periods of time, and each Period of the Cenozoic Era is divided into Epochs of time.   Please click on the link below for a diagram of the Periods and Epochs in the Cenozoic Era, and for important information about the rise of the Mammals.  This link below shows that the last Ice Age ended 10,000 years ago and the time period (epoch) since then is called the Holocene Epoch.  There has been a series of “ice ages” over billions of years, with the “Great Ice Age” occurring during the Pleistocene Epoch of the Cenozoic Era, 1.8 million to 10,000 years ago.

http://www.bobainsworth.com/fossil/cenozoic.htm

The dinosaurs had become extinct and now it was the Age of the Mammals, arising in the Palaeocene Epoch of the Cenozoic Era, 65 to 55 mya; with the modern line of human beings (from the genus Homo) developing 1.6 mya to 2 mya.  During the Pleistocene Epoch of the Cenozoic Era, there were four completely separate glacial advances in North America.  The advances were separated by long intervals of ice withdrawal, sufficient to permit the previously occupied area covered by ice to be reoccupied by plants and animals.   Glaciation severely affected life on the earth.   Animal and plant life was forced out of vast portions of the land covered by continental ice sheets. Large-scale migrations must have taken place as the ice sheets grew and climatic changes occurred.

Click here to see some wonderful preserved skeletons of some of the “mega-fauna” (large mammals) of the Pleisotcene Epoch (1.8 mya to 10,000 years ago).

Read more…

Unique Animals of Australia

Here are some unique animals of Australia, that I have personally seen, or have some knowledge or interest in.   I have listed below or after the Gallery (photos) a list of the Animals names, against the number of each picture.   Click on the name in the List after the Gallery to go to a page that gives information about that animal. 

The Numbat (picture 10) is the fauna emblem of Western Australia.

Read more…

Good Books on Animals

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If you want to stop the pictures moving (changing) in the slideshow, just hover your mouse over a picture and click on the square Stop button.

Continue reading the whole article if you want to read about my adventures with “Red Dog” and David Attenborough !

I thought I would list the books I have, about Animals! I have just acquired a companion book to one of my very favourites, being “Strongheart Story of a Wonder Dog”. The companion book is J. Allen Boone’s 1959 edition of “Letters to Strongheart”.   I have just ordered the 1959 Letters to Strongheart and it is on its way to me as I write this.  You can read about the book “Strongheart – Story of a Wonder Dog” at this post   here.

I love reading and writing.  All of my many books are cherished by me, because I am a “bookworm”.  I am also a “read-worm” if that term exists, as I am always reading things – WordPress Blogs, labels on food containers, road signs, car signs, anything and everything.

Read more…

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