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Archive for the category “Scientific”

Who Is the Strongest?

READ  MORE   HERE   !

The half inch long dung beetles are the strongest living creatures on Earth. The male insects of this small species of insects can lift or pull 1141 times their own body weight. It is just like an average sized human carrying 80 tons or 72574.8 kg.

The news might take the shine off the title of World’s Strongest Man for Lithuanian Zydrunas Savickas; in 2009 he pulled a 70-tonne plane for 30m in under 75 seconds – this works out as only 411 times his 170kg body weight.

What makes dung beetles so strong?

Written Mar 26, 2016  by John Cassis

Small creatures all seem strong relative to their size, because their strength is relative to the cross sectional *area* of their muscles, not their weight or volume. If you double the length of an organism, the muscle cross-section goes up four-fold, but the weight and volume go up 8 fold – so you get bigger-er not stronger-er.

Another way of looking at it is that if a dung beetle can lift it’s own weight, then if it were to double in size, it could only lift half of its weight, without developing proportionally bulkier muscles.

This topic was famously covered in a 1928 essay by JBS Haldane, called “On being the right size”. I think it’s one of the most lucid science essays I’ve ever read.

See also:

http://britton.disted.camosun.bc.ca/scalefactor/factors.html

http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20161121-the-worlds-strongest-animal-can-lift-staggering-weights

Well, today at work I was barely able to lift a heavy box (to me) of files, weighing 15 kg.  My weight is 43 kg only, and if I take the load ( 15 ) and divide it by my personal petite weight ( of 43 kg), the result is 0.35 – which is a very rough SWR !!

STRENGTH TO WEIGHT RATIO

The Link above does mention working out this ratio uses averages including “Bench presses”.  You may, like me, innocently ask “But what IS a Bench press ??”    It is laying on your back and picking up weights on a bar and raising them up and straight above, in my terms.  Looks dangerous to me!  Wikipedia says:

The bench press is an upper body strength training exercise that consists of pressing a weight upwards from a supine position. … A barbell is generally used to hold the weight, but a pair of dumbbells can also be used.

This page  HERE  mentions averaging out your ratios after different types of exercises, like squats and bench presses.  The closest I note that matches lifting a heavy (for me) box is the DEADLIFT –  read  HERE for info.

However, my “dead-weight Lift” involved a square shape and a dense solid mass, not a nice (looking) bar with weights at either end – this different structure makes a difference to your SWR.

The box I lifted was destined to go to an off-site storage company, that has a weight limit for each packed box (to be picked up and carried by their drivers) – – – and that Limit is 16 kg.  Not bad therefore that I could lift 15 kg, in my great opinion.

My 43 kg weight converts to 95 pounds.   I used   THIS  site to work out that (in theory) a 45 kg female could or should (if she wanted) lift a 26 kg dead-weight.   Speaking for myself, I had best do some intense “resistance” (strength) training, before I attempt picking up and lifting a BARBELL (bar to attach weights to)  with any weights on it at all !!

If you are keen to find out more about weight training equipment for human beings,  try  THIS  page.  It mentions the lightest weight plates (which affix to the barbell) are 2.5 pounds for Americans or 1.13 kg for Australians.  It seems an average barbell itself (without the weights at the end) weighs 20 kg.  It would be a great day when I  dead-lift 21 kg total (barbell + 0.5 kg weight at each end), let alone 26 kg -barbell plus a 3kg weight at each end.

That would mean a SWR of approximately 0.5 up alot from an SWR of 0.35 for my “dead-box” lift today (LOL).  I would be happy with being able to lift 50% of my body weight, even if the Weaver Ant can lift 10 to 50 times its body weight !!

See:

http://britton.disted.camosun.bc.ca/scalefactor/factors2.html

http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20161121-the-worlds-strongest-animal-can-lift-staggering-weights

Wolves change Rivers – Yellowstone National Park

Ecology is the branch of biology that deals with the relations of organisms to one another and to their physical surroundings.  Sometimes I read people’s comments on Forums saying to never give anyone advice about anything much, because you don’t know how you will affect the person you are trying to give advice to!  You may make things worse.

Well, that is very funny to me, and not logical at all, because we are all Life Forms including Homo sapiens or human beings.

As such, in the 3-D world / reality, we are built or formed to interact with other Life and our natural environment.  Nobody can stop the “march or the tide of Ecology” including  Human Ecology ( yes there is a formal study called Human Ecology ).   F.E.A.R. of False Evidence Appearing Real motivates some not to interact with others, for fear of upsetting them or making things worse.

But nobody is an Island and if you believe each human being has a brain and an awareness, and personality & Ego of their own, then you can know that each person is capable of and indeed responsible for how she / he responds to communications or actions toward her / him, or to anything !

Anyhow in 1995, as shown in the Video above, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, along with Canadian biologists, captured 14 wolves in Canada and placed them in Yellowstone National Park, where they had been extinct since 1926. Over the next few years, the number of wolves rose, but that was the least of the changes that took place in Yellowstone.

This is indeed an incidence of GOOD ECOLOGY, in this case human precipitated.  Just because the wolves had become extinct in 1926 did the Scientists leave things as they were?  No, I for one am glad they did not leave the status quo, but did their research and on the understanding how Ecology works, these 14 amazing Wolves were introduced to Yellowstone National Park.

 

Australian government on “probation” – to save the Great Barrier Reef

Great Barrier Reef In June 2015 the UNESCO World Heritage Committee made a historic decision for the Great Barrier Reef that put the Australian government on probation until the Reef’s health improves.  The Australian Government now has until 2016 to show that its rescue plan is working and until 2019 to demonstrate it has stopped the decline of the Reef. The most significant features of the decision are:

  • The World Heritage Committee expressed concern that the outlook for the Reef is poor and key habitats and species have continued to decline, and listed climate change, poor water quality, and coastal development impacts as the major threats.
  • The Committee will continue its vital role as a watchdog to ensure Australia “rigorously implements all of its commitments”.
  • An acknowledgement that the existing financial commitment to the Reef 2050 plan is an ‘initial’ amount – a clear indication the Committee recognizes that the plan is underfunded.
  • If the Reef’s World Heritage values continue to decline, then an ‘in-danger’ listing will almost certainly be delivered at the 2020 meeting.

Just 12 months ago, the Australian Government had approved plans to dump millions of tonnes of dredge spoil from mega-port expansions into the Great Barrier Reef’s waters. On 1st July, that approval was overturned and WWF expects a ban on dumping from new port development in the Reef’s World Heritage waters to be in force within months. Read more   HERE turtle_Great_Barrier_ReefThe Great Barrier Reef (GBR) stretches 2,300 kilometres along the Queensland coast and includes over 2,900 reefs, and around 940 islands and cays. The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park is 345,000 square kilometres in size, five times the size of Tasmania or larger that the United Kingdom and Ireland combined! The reef is immensely diverse. It is home to more than 1,500 species of fish, 411 types of hard coral, one-third of the world’s soft corals, 134 species of sharks and rays, six of the world’s seven species of threatened marine turtles, and more than 30 species of marine mammals, including the vulnerable dugong. Add to that stunning marine suite as many as 3,000 molluscs and thousands of different sponges, worms and crustaceans, 630 species of echinoderms (starfish and sea urchins) and 215 bird species, of which 22 are seabirds. The GBR is listed under all four natural World Heritage criteria for its outstanding universal value.

READ MORE AT THE   WORLD WILDLIFE FUND WEBSITE

GET YOUR COPY OF AUSTRALIA’S   “REEF 2050 PLAN”    HERE

Click on the “Reef 2050 Long-Term Sustainability Plan” link – to download the FULL plan

Let’s have Fun – go in the Polls !

Okay, it’s time to slow down a bit and have some fun or entertainment by having your say in one of the “Fascinating Animals” and / or “Our Lovely World” Polls.

It’s easy – just click on the Titles above or on the Links below to join in, and to view the Results.

I’ll even place a Poll in this Post.  Don’t be lethargic or stick-in-the-mud, your say is “annonymous” and the results could be quite interesting.

https://facinatingamazinganimals.wordpress.com/polls/

https://starstruckworld.wordpress.com/polls/

 

NOW, for this Post’s Poll !

In the Beginning was ……  no, you CAN’T choose Aliens or God or Nothing or the Void, because the Poll is actually about either Light or Sound

I once attended an Astrology course and had an argument with the teacher about whether Light or Sound was in the VERY beginning, the first thing emanating from the “Void”.  You may choose to say there was both Light and Sound at the same time, but it will be interesting to see how many choose only “Light” and how many choose only “Sound.”

 

This Post  about what physicist Professor Brian Cox says about “what makes the universe up or down” may help you answer.

By the way, the reason for my answer can be found by clicking  HERE.

ENJOY, if you do, and share with your friends.

Polite discussion about this Poll is invited.  You will need a WordPress Username to comment (which is a requirement to try to stop spammers from posting silly stuff on this Blog).

Click on the tab titled “WordPress” at the top for steps on how to get a WordPress Username/”Account”.

Ocean Conservancy – Marine Wildlife and Seascape Photo Contest

Gulf of Mexico

The Ocean Conservancy’s Summer 2014 Marine Wildlife and Seascape Photo Contest received more than 1,200 entries.

The top two prizes were awarded to Ian Lindsey and Christian Martinez, whose photographs received Judges’ Choice and People’s Choice.

Ian’s photo “Honu Gathering” depicts a group of sea turtles gathered on a Hawaiian beach at sunset, while Christian’s image “Ocean, Waves and Nature” perfectly captures the beauty of a Puerto Rican beach.

This summer’s contest also included winners from five different categories: Arctic, Our Ocean, Fish, Gulf of Mexico and Human Impact.  The winning photographs for these categories can be found  HERE.

Read more…

AQWA – Aquarium of Western Australia

BigFishatAQWA

Yesterday Thursday 26th June, I went with my sister & partner to AQWA at Hillary’s Boat Harbour, Western Australia.

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Stop the landfill of the Dugong habitat in Okinawa

Urgent stamp

Please sign and share this   PETITION   calling on Okinawa Governor Nakaima to deny the landfill application for the waters of Henoko.

Okinawa dugong, a close relative of the manatee and the northernmost population of its species, is now on the verge of extinction. The dugong, a gentle marine mammal once commonly seen around Okinawa, has long been a symbol of the sea rich in life. The coast off Henoko, in Nago, still beautiful with wildlife such as corals and turtles, holds a rich sea-grass colony where the dugong feed.

However, there are plans to landfill this area to construct a US military base.

In March, Minister of Defense Itsunori Onodera filed with Okinawa Governor Hirokazu Nakaima an application for approval to landfill waters off Henoko in order to build a new base. This filing used an environmental assessment conducted by the Defense Bureau to claim that the dugongs will “stay far away from the construction site”.

The Governor has already expressed grave concerns regarding the environmental assessment and impact on the welfare of local residents. In response, the Defense Bureau has simply maintained its assertion that the dugongs would not be affected.

But on September 22, Kyodo News broke the story that the Defense Bureau had actively hidden important facts about dugong activity in Henoko waters uncovered during its environmental assessment.

Dugong feeding traces had been found in the waters off Henoko through April to June last year and a dugong was sighted in Oura Bay, adjacent to the Henoko beach. It’s clear that for the Defense Bureau, those findings constituted ‘inconvenient truths’ better hidden from the public.

The Governor will make his decision on the project before December. If this project is carried out, the Henoko seagrass beds, together with the Okinawa dugong, will be lost forever.

We hope all the people of the world will join us in an effort to continue to co-exist with the dugongs. Please sign and share our   petition   calling on Okinawa Governor Nakaima to deny the landfill application for the waters of Henoko.

TAKE ACTION NOW

Thank you for your support.

From the Association to Protect the Northernmost Dugong —
Masako Suzuki, Etsuko Urashima, Iyanaga Kenichi

Henoko, Okinawa, Japan

Anglo American Dumps the Pebble Mine in Alaska

Anglo American Dumps the Pebble Mine

By Joel Reynolds, September 16, 2013

Today Anglo American, a 50 percent partner in the Pebble Limited Partnership, announced that it is withdrawing from Pebble Mine – a giant gold and copper mine proposed at the headwaters of Bristol Bay, Alaska.  The London-based mining giant finally recognized what Alaska Natives, Bristol Bay residents, commercial fishermen, sportsmen, lodge owners, chefs, jewelers, EPA scientists, NRDC and others have been saying for years: Pebble Mine poses too great of a risk.

Anglo American Chief Executive Mark Cutifani issued a statement lauding the “rare magnitude and quality” of the Pebble deposit, while also justifying Anglo’s plans to withdraw from the risky venture: “Our focus has been to prioritise capital to projects with the highest value and lowest risks within our portfolio, and reduce the capital required to sustain such projects during the pre-approval phases of development as part of a more effective, value-driven capital allocation model.”

There is no question that Pebble Mine is a  bad investment, replete with environmental, economic, operational,  reputational, social, regulatory, and legal risks.  Mitsubishi Corporation realized it in 2011 when it sold 100% of its interest in the Pebble project.  Anglo American realized it only after spending $541 million trying to develop Pebble Mine.

Proposed at the headwaters of the world’s greatest wild salmon fishery, Pebble Mine would threaten the region’s internationally renowned salmon runs.  Salmon are the economic, cultural, and ecological linchpin of the region, supporting a  $1.5 billion annual commercial fishery that employ 14,000 workers.  Salmon also sustain the culture, tradition, and spirituality of native communities that have relied on subsistence fishing for thousands of years, and they are food to a vast array of wildlife, including bears, eagles, seals and whales.

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The Pale Blue Dot Again – Professor Brian Cox & the Universe

Re-blogging a post from one of my other Blogs here, as it is about the “stuff” that makes us all up, as well as that makes up the Stars!   Please click on the Link above to read or print the Article.

Our Lovely World

Part One

BRIAN-COX-banner-610x225

Last night my partner and I went to the PCEC   ( Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre )  to hear U.K. Prof. Brian Cox, Particle Physicist, talk about physics and the cosmos.  The talk ran for 3 hours from 8pm to 11pm.  While we loved the talk and the PCEC and the Riverside Theatre where the talk was held, it was a bit of a torture finding parking and leaving the car park later.

We went into the PCEC car park via Mill Street off St Georges Terrace, where there were Traffic lights.  We drove around for a while, not having driven there before, wondering where the heck all the supposed empty car bays were and wondering which way to go.  Then my partner intelligently saw some bays toward the very back of the car park so we headed that way and got a park.  Luckily, we had left…

View original post 1,895 more words

Trichogramma Wasp

Trichogramma_wasp

Scientific Classification:   Phylum Arthropoda, Class Insecta,  Order Hymenoptera, family Trichogrammatidae, approx 650 Trichogramma spp.

Imagine if you were only about half a centimetre in size and had a life span of just 2 weeks.  You wouldn’t have time to complain about others or to feel angry or jealous of others.  The Trichogramma Wasp is just such a creature.  Adults are 1/50 inch or 0.18mm in dimension, and are a beautiful golden yellow in colour, or yelow and black, with bright red eyes, short antennae and compact bodies.

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The San Joaquin Kit Fox

Kit fox

The San Joaquin Kit Fox  couresty of   Dave Collins

Phylum   Chordata

Class      Mammalia

Order      Carnivora

Family     Canidae

Genus     Vulpes

Species   velox

A Kit Fox is either of two small pale gray or buff coloured foxes, Vulpes velox macrotis  or Vulpes velox velox,  found on plains and in open, sandy areas of western North America, commercially valuable for their fur.

In the U.S.A. the San Joaquin Kit Fox species, Vulpes velox macrotis, was federally classified as Endangered in 1967, and as Threatened by the state of California in 1971 (USFWS 1998).  It is sometimes referred to as Vulpes macrotis mutica.

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Mantis Shrimp

mantis_shrimp_body_armor-7

Image Source

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Crustacea
Class: Malacostraca
Subclass: Hoplocarida
 Order Stomatopoda

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UPDATE Australia takes Japan to International Court to save Minke Whales

NEWS FLASH 1 APRIL 2014

JAPAN ORDERED TO IMMEDIATELY STOP WHALING !!!!!  

ABC explains here – please read

 

humpback460

From   Whales Alive   –   21 June 2013

The case against Japan’s whaling program being heard at the    International court of Justice   (ICJ) begins at The Hague on Wednesday June 26th.

“Japan will be severely embarrassed by being dragged to this international court” says Mick McIntyre,  Executive Director of Australian based whale conservation group Whales Alive. McIntyre  will be attending the court case as an observer.

The case against Japan has been brought  by the Australian Government who will argue that  Japan’s  whaling program in the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary breaches international law .

“We all know that Japan’s so called scientific whaling program is a sham and finally we have the law on our side” says McIntyre.

“We expect the judges of the ICJ to agree with the Australian Government that Japan’s whaling contravenes international law.”

“This case against Japan is a once in a generation opportunity to stop this barbaric whaling, which is outdated, inherently cruel and for products that nobody needs.”

Blue-Whale-Desktop-Wallpapers

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Sounds – Test your Hearing

Pitch or frequency is measured in Hertz and Kilohertz (kHz), while the loudness or amplitude of sound is measured in Decibels.  As amplitude increases, intensity also increases.  Intensity is the amount of energy a sound has over an area.  The more energy a sound wave has, the higher its amplitude or loudness.

A sound you hear in a large area is more intense if you hear it in a smaller area.  In other words, the same sound has greater intensity or is louder in a smaller area or in the area where the sound immediately emanates from.  This is because the  energy of a particular sound distributed throughout a smaller area means more sound waves per unit of space, compared to the same sound distributed throughout a much bigger area.  In other words, in layman’s terms, the further away you are from a sound, the less likely you can hear it.

A whisper is about 10 decibels while thunder is 100 decibels.  Normal conversation is around 60 decibels, and an operating lawn mower, 100 decibels loud.  The weakest sound that can be heard is measured at 0 decibel.  There are such things as “decibel meters” which allow one to measure how loud a sound is.

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Palm oil in Australia: Facts, Issues and Challenges

A recent report has this to say about orangutans.

Estimates made in 2005 put the Bornean population at between 45,000 and 69,000, and the Sumatran population at about 7,300.75 Since 1900, 91 per cent of the Sumatran orang-utans have died, most of these in the past decade. The remaining population lives in fragmented forest areas totalling about 10,000 square miles, much of which is marked for future palm oil development. At the current rates of decline, both species are likely to be extinct in the wild within ten years.

Please go to the website of the WWF Australia (World Wildlife Fund) now, to download a copy of a comprehensive report about palm oil plantations and the socio-economic and environmental impacts at this page   here.

The Report was commissioned by the  WWF and The Australian Food & Grocery Council and written by an independent researcher, Net Balance Foundation, using an investigation from 2010.

Help yourself by supporting the biodiversity on Earth, and get informed about the important facts, rather than “stick your head in the sand” and ignore this important issue, or leave it to others to follow up.  Also, please read the posts on this blog about Orang-utans and Elephants, and read the Action Alert page.

http://www.wwf.org.au/news_resources/resource_library/?6761/palm-oil-in-australia

elephant thank you

Help stop the Navy’s Attack on Whales NOW

save whales poster

The U.S. Navy is prepared to kill more than 1,000 whales and other marine mammals during the next five years of testing and training with dangerous sonar and explosives. Tell Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel to direct the Navy to adopt common-sense safeguards right away that will protect marine mammals during routine training without sacrificing our national security!

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Help Blue Whales

Blue-Whale-Desktop-Wallpapers

 

At 100 feet long,   the blue whale  is believed to be the largest animal to have ever lived on our planet.

So it’s absolutely horrifying that these gentle giants are being struck and killed by commercial ships off the coast of California — especially because there is a simple life-saving solution!

If the Navy opened the waters around its Pt. Mugu Naval Air Station to commercial traffic, then hundreds of cargo ships, oil tankers and cruise liners could bypass the blue whale’s feeding grounds and be much less likely to strike and kill them.

But so far, the Navy has refused.

Tell the Obama Administration to help save some of the world’s last blue whales by opening Naval waters to commercial traffic.

Fewer than 10,000 of these magnificent creatures survive today. So one death from a ship strike is one too many!

Every summer and fall, blue whales migrate to the California coast to feed on the massive blooms of krill, their favorite food.

Unfortunately, these feeding grounds have been invaded by some of the world’s busiest shipping lanes, with massive tankers moving millions of tons of cargo to the busy ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.

The tragic result? Helpless blue whales are rammed by the giant ships or cut to ribbons by the huge propellers.

Even more mind-boggling, the cost of moving these shipping lanes away from the blue whale’s feeding grounds would be relatively small. The Coast Guard knows they should be moved, and the shipping industry has stated it is willing to do so.

Only the Navy stands in the way!

Tell the Obama Administration to end the carnage by opening the Navy’s waters to commercial traffic.

Let’s not wait until hundreds more blue whales have suffered and died. Thank you for make your voice heard in defense of whales.

Sincerely,
Frances Beinecke
President
Natural Resources Defense Council

Bits and Bites – Teeth: Part One – General information

Source:    http://www.ket.org/trips/dentist/animalteeth.htm

Animal teeth are adapted for getting and chewing food. They can also be used for other purposes, such as protection or even building their homes!

Animals that eat meat are called carnivores. They have large canine teeth to hold and tear meat. Wolves, tigers, cats, and dogs are carnivores and have lots of sharp canine teeth. They need these strong, sharp teeth for catching and holding their prey. They bite their prey and tear the meat into pieces. They do not chew their food well, swallowing it whole or in large chunks. Some fish have teeth to help them catch their prey.

Animals that eat only plants are called herbivores. A herbivore’s long front incisors have sharp edges that are good for cutting grass and leaves. They have large molars at the back of their mouths for grinding and crushing the stems, leaves, fruits, seeds, and roots of plants. Their flat molars are used for grinding the plants. The long front incisors of beavers and squirrels can break into nuts and seeds. Squirrels crack nutshells with their teeth. (Don’t you try that!) Beavers, squirrels, and other rodents have teeth that keep growing all their lives. They sharpen their teeth by gnawing as they eat. Grazing animals such as horses, cows, and sheep need their large back molars for grinding up grass and grain.

Animals that eat both plants and animals are called omnivores. They have both canines and molars. Are you a carnivore, a herbivore, or an omnivore? Animals have a much simpler diet than people do.

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Bits and Bites – Teeth: Part Two – the Structure & Function of Human Teeth

anatomy of a human tooth

Extract from  Online Britannica

Tooth, plural teeth,  any of the hard, resistant structures occurring on the jaws and in or around the mouth and pharynx areas of vertebrates. Teeth are used for catching and masticating food, for defense, and for other specialized purposes.

The teeth of vertebrates represent the modified descendants of bony dermal (skin) plates that armoured ancestral fishes. A tooth consists of a crown and one or more roots. The crown is the functional part that is visible above the gum. The root is the unseen portion that supports and fastens the tooth in the jawbone. The root is attached to the tooth-bearing bone—the alveolar processes—of the jaws by a fibrous ligament called the periodontal ligament or membrane. The “neck” of the root is embraced by the fleshy gum tissue (a specialized area of connective tissue covered with mucous membrane that lines the mouth cavity). The shape of the crown and root vary among different teeth and among different species of animals.

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Bits and Bites – Teeth: Part Three – Teeth Numbering & Cats and Dogs

How many teeth does a human adult have?

32

How many teeth does my cat have?

30

How many teeth does my dog have?

42

For diagrams of the teeth of cats, dogs, and horses, visit this wonderful page   here  ( URL below also ).

http://www.bradfordfamilydentist.ca/human-teeth-vs-dog-cat-horse-dental-charts/#CAT

Universal Tooth Numbering System

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